The Handmaid’s FAIL?

Millions of years ago when I was in school, I read The Handmaid’s Tale. And I’ll confess–as with all of Margaret Atwood’s works, it gave me the creeps. I don’t remember every precise detail of its story. However, I still have enough of it with me to recall its overarching themes. It deals specifically with women’s reproductive rights and the horrors of living in a society where our agency has been removed.

Flash forward to today. A TV adaptation is about to be released. And something is amiss in the way the actors are discussing their material.

Last night I read some tweets* by a reporter who was present at a screening. Her words made me do a double-take. Then earlier today, I read this piece on Vulture’s web site. Elizabeth Moss, who plays Offred said

“Honestly, for me it’s not a feminist story — it’s a human story, because women’s rights are human rights. I never intended to play Peggy as a feminist; I never intended to play Offred as a feminist. They’re women and they are humans…”

(Emphasis added.)

A part of me feels terrible. I don’t want to make assumptions about Ms. Moss. If that’s how she feels about The Handmaid’s Tale, that’s her right. But from what I read on Twitter, she wasn’t the only cast member attempting to disown her show’s heritage.

At this point I’d like to offer the film and television industry’s PR people some advice.

Firstly, “feminism” is NOT a dirty word. It is nothing to be ashamed of. The people who think it’s divisive are probably the same people who think that it’s wrong to talk about racism.

But that’s another rant for another time…

I agree completely with the Vulture piece’s opening. We’re at an interesting point in human history. A reality-TV star is president. Still, even before he was elected, people were taking to the streets–and their keyboards–unafraid to take a stand against injustice. In that light, I’d like to argue that it is more than safe for an individual to own who and what s/he is.

The same can be said for our works of art. Reading Ms. Moss’s words, I couldn’t help but wonder if the Tale’s actors were coached to deny the production’s feminist overtones. I’d like to know why. Are producers afraid of offending their audience?

Take it from me as a Black person: Not everything is for everyone. There are folks out there who will reject you for your inherent traits. Why not revel in your production’s uniqueness? Downplaying something that is so obvious to onlookers, such as The Handmaid’s Tale’s feminist elements makes you look cowardly and dishonest.

Furthermore, it’s not necessary. Your work will draw the audience that it is meant to have, period–regardless of their gender or political stance.

Denying The Handmaid’s Tale’s feminist themes is like saying Roots has nothing to do with Black people. I don’t see what the point is in dancing around the obvious, other than an attempt to win over a disinterested audience.

If that’s the case, I have the feeling that the Tale’s producers are in for a very rude awakening. And like those who regret voting for you-know-who, when certain folks have an epiphany, it won’t be pretty.

*In case you think I’m weird with my,”Someone on Twitter said something….” check out this Vanity Fair piece. I Googled after I wrote my post and the title says it all.

Books: See Me After Class

Well, guys. I still want to work in education.

I’ll tell you about that another time. Long story short–yesterday I had one hell of an epiphany about my career. Last night I went and shopped my basement for teaching books. Thank God I didn’t burn them like I’d once planned. I found most of them. Among the pile, I was happy to see one in particular: See Me After Class by Roxanna Elden.

seemeafterclass-cover

This was the first authentic book on teaching that I’d ever read. The teaching-book landscape can be tough. Some volumes can seem polished to the point of stiffness. And don’t get me wrong. Those sort of books have their place.

Yet that’s not the only thing that new teachers need. When you’re in or out of the classroom and you feel like you’re losing your mind, you need a voice that can offer you perspective. You need someone who knows that classroom management issues don’t correct themselves as magically as they do in the movies.

I have a ton of other books, like Teaching to Transgress and When Kids Can’t Read. But I think Ms. Elden’s book is going to be the first one that I re-read as I get my mind back on track. Her work covers a variety of scenarios–dealing with colleagues, your “teacher” personality, marking assignments, etc. And of course, there are the myths. Have any of you teachers out there heard the phrase “don’t smile ’til Christmas”? (If you don’t work in education, you should know that some people advise teachers not to smile until before their first major holiday. No doubt, this is supposed to show students that we are serious professionals.)

Man.

If I followed that rule, my face would fall off.

See Me After Class offers readers a realistic look at teaching. I recommend it to anyone who’s new to the profession.

Idea: BlackGirlMagic Syllabus

I’m in a season of self-appreciation. As a part of my self-care routine, I know that I need to take care of my mind. And as a Black, female writer, I believe one of the greatest gifts I can give myself is a commitment to reading more books that are by or about* Black women. One night last week it hit me: I need to start a #BlackGirlMagic Syllabus.

blackgirlmagicsyllabus
I’m sure this isn’t an original idea. Tons of people read authors who share their background all the time. But as I get closer to myself, I know this is something that I need to keep up. The words of other Black women soothe my spirit.
This little idea of mine almost makes me wonder. Is there a mode of therapy out there called Healing Through Literature?
What sort of books speak to your soul?
*When it comes to diverse books, I know a writer’s approach is critical. Right now I’m reading Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older—an author that I trust.

Books: Brazen

brazen-cover-sept-12-2016I remember when I first read Brazen. After an evening out, my copy was at home waiting for me. Earlier, I’d gone to Paris Lectures–an event where I’d shared some of my dreams in front of a hometown crowd. Since then, I’ve paid close attention to my struggle to keep my aspirations alive.

Overall, Brazen focuses on the impact that self-doubt can have on us as we pursue our goals. It takes faith to beat a doubtful spirit: Our passions are a gift. We need to cultivate them.

In Brazen, the author explores the connection between our dreams and the ways that we view and receive God in our lives.

This book may not be for everyone. Fundamentalists probably won’t like the author’s easygoing tone, or the fact that she mentions yoga. They may even hate that her book is interactive, complete with exercises involving a Brazen Board (the author’s version of a vision board) at the end of each chapter.

While reading Brazen, I frequently stopped to underline passages. I enjoyed scrawling page numbers at the back of the book, knowing that I would look at them later on. The author offers her readers many rare gems. For instance: One of Brazen’s chapters contains a good, solid word about clutter and self-care. I’d never thought about those two issues related quite in the way the author explained them. Quite honestly, those pages alone would have made Brazen worth its price if I hadn’t gotten my copy for free.

As far as I’m concerned, Brazen’s author did her job. In this life, you need to be Brazen and honest about what you want. The best way to do that is by being your most authentic, God-given self.

Disclosure: Brazen has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

 

Review: A Year of Biblical Womanhood by Rachel Held Evans


Source

Rachel Held Evans’ A Year of Biblical Womanhood is engaging. She brings her readers on a journey and shows us what can happen when someone decides to take some of the Bible’s commands concerning feminine conduct literally.

For those readers who are not aware, there’s a faction of Christianity that is obsessed with upholding certain standards among men and women. When people discuss Biblical womanhood they often emphasize things such as the notion that a woman should focus on bearing and caring for children, as well as being modest and submissive.

In light of this idea, what did some of Ms. Held Evans’ duties include?

Over the course of her year of experimentation, she did things such as alter her mode of dress and wear a head covering as a display of modesty. She also sequestered herself in a tent and avoided touching men during her “time of the month”. Although these changes may sound odd to our modern ears, one can easily find support for them in scripture. Which begs the question that I believe drove Ms. Held Evans’ work: When people say that they support Biblically-based gender roles, just how far are they willing to take things?

In my opinion, Rachel Held Evans’ book illustrates a flaw in a much-heralded system. It’s true that there are women who prefer domestic pursuits. However what about those who do not fit the mold?

I have a love-hate relationship with feminine virtues. I think that having a family is a blessing. If my time and budget allowed for it, I would welcome the chance to get married and be a homemaker. However, what if, after having children, I decide that I would like to go back to work? Or, what if none of my domestic dreams come true? There are Christian women out there who are single and/or childless whose existence does not deserve to be diminished.

It seems foolish to me to reduce femininity to a series of stereotypes. Yet many individuals and entire church communities have no problem displaying a bias in the way that they treat women who do not fit the mold of a so-called Biblical woman.

For challenging these notions, Rachel Held Evans will have my eternal respect and gratitude.

Apart from my regular review, in writing about this book, I believe I would be remiss if I didn’t address some of the controversy surrounding it.

Lifeway Christian Resources is an American bookstore chain that has decided not to carry Ms. Held Evans’ book. Although the official reason remains unknown, Ms. Held Evans has mentioned that she believes that their rationale has something to do with her use of the word “vagina”.

I disagree. I saw the dreaded v-word in her text. To be quite honest, I barely noticed it. (I believe my reaction was, “What? That’s IT…?”)

However, throughout Biblical Womanhood I saw items that I thought provided evidence of the real reason why Lifeway would not permit her book to be on their shelves.

The more I read, the more one thing became clear to me: The ideas that Held Evans expressed do not coincide with the conservative Evangelical community’s agenda*. And quite frankly, customers who follow said agenda are big-box “Christian” bookstores’ bread and butter.

Here are a few of the things that I believe fundamentalists might object to:

1. Rachel does not frown on Catholicism. (Among other minor indiscretions, in one chapter she spends time in a monastery.) In response to my mentioning this, I know many will say “So what?” However, in this day and age I still encounter people who believe that Catholics do not worship God.

2. Rachel mentions aspects of other religions in a non-judgmental way. When she says things such as how if she was feeling differently about a particular circumstance** she might read the Bhagavad Gita, she doesn’t offer any apologies or disclaimers. Mind you…I know that a person can be rooted in Christ yet respectful of other religions. However in most Fundamentalists’ minds, such a thing is impossible. In fact, if you admit to some folks that you can learn something relevant from another faith’s traditions, you may as well tell them that you are consorting with the devil.

3. Time and again she attempts to edify her readers concerning the content of God’s word. Her book contains references to historical context for certain passages, as well as little-known facts. Her writing does not discredit the Bible. Yet here I feel it’s vital to note something. I notice that there tends to be a rift between what some Christians think the Bible says, versus what is actually in the text. I admire the fact that Ms. Held Evans aims to close that gap. However I’m not sure that others will feel the same way.

4. Rachel dares to call a spade a spade. In light of her book’s general premise, Ms. Held Evans speaks openly about some of the problems related to Evangelicals’ gender bias. Along the way, she mentions one of Evangelical Christianity’s leaders–John Piper. In addition to being a popular author and speaker, Pastor Piper is one of the cofounders of the Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood. Some of his ideas are interesting–or troubling, depending on who you speak to. Either way, in her chapter entitled “Silence” Rachel provides interesting food for thought related to regulations concerning women speaking–and teaching–in church. I deeply respect Ms. Held-Evans for noting the potential flaws in a popular leader’s line of thinking. Nevertheless I also know that there are those who likely believe that John Piper’s ideas are above reproach.

Let me make myself clear: I do not have a problem with any of these points. In fact, Held Evans’ honesty is one of the things that I love the most about A Year of Biblical Womanhood.

However, I think that with her latest book, Rachel Held Evans may have reached her Rob Bell* moment. She has shown that she is not afraid to discuss ideas that are contrary to what the Evangelical establishment expects. Overall, I think this is wonderful. In spite of what critics may have to say there are scores of people like me who appreciate Held Evans’ bravery.

Women need to know that their faith communities recognize their worth—beyond the domestic realm. In that regard, Rachel Held Evans’ work is revolutionary. I look forward to reading her next book.

*Maybe I’m off my rocker for theorizing about why Lifeway isn’t carrying her book. But I think I’ve read enough Christian books and known enough Fundamentalists in my day to make a solid hypothesis. If you believe I’m being unfair, let me know in the comments below.

**I apologize for being so vague. (Rachel, feel free to correct me!) There’s a sentence where Held Evans casually mentions the Bhagavad Gita. It was a very simple passage, and I didn’t take proper notes on it. Suffice it to say it was as harmless as me saying that I’d consult the Koran if I was interested in learning about Muhammad.

***I haven’t read the straw that broke the camel’s back. Yet I know that Rob Bell is an author who has been slammed for not toeing the party line. I say that respectfully, in spite of the fact that I may not agree with everything that Mr. Bell may believe.

Book has been provided courtesy of Thomas Nelson and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. Available at your favourite bookseller from Thomas Nelson.